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Tuesday, 21 June 2011

What's Growing in the 1940s Garden?

The recent rain has done wonders for the garden, and after a dry spell that seems to have lasted for months, the vegetables are, at last, beginning to look more healthy. Things are definitely growing much more slowly this year, and crops that were providing our school kitchen with fresh food last year, have yet to produce very much. We have, however, been eating fresh salad leaves and radishes, and soon there will be new potatoes to add to the menu. 

Many other vegetables are being grown in the garden this year, the majority being varieties that would've been grown during the war years. The following pictures should give you an idea of what is being grown in our garden this year.



 
Potatoes growing in barrels and bags.
Tomatilloes.
Radishes growing in the salad bed.
Lettuce growing in the salad bed; 'Little Gem' and 'Giant Red Mustard'. Carrots and Pac Choi grow behind.
Pac Choi.
Potato bed with sugar snap peas growing around the outside.
Gooseberries.
Pansies.
Tomato plants in the greenhouse.
Peppers and chillies growing in the greenhouse.
Kale plants waiting to be planted out.

Runner beans.
 Broad beans.
French climbing beans; Borlotti beans; Ying Yang beans (foreground) Chard & Spinach (background).
Broad beans - dwarf and long pod varieties.
Spinach and Chard bed. Cabbage is growing along the far side of the bed.
Root Vegetables including carrot, Swede, parsnip, turnip, beetroot, garlic and Shallots.
Another view of the root veg bed.
Anderson Shelter with Nastertium plants growing on top.Globa Artichokes growing to the right, and sunflowers to the left.
Apples growing on our new apple trees.
Sweet potatoes growing in pots.
Pumpkin & Squash patch.
Another view of the pumpkin bed.
Jerusalem Artichokes.
Borage.
Florence Fennel.
Herb Garden: Thyme, Rosemary, Fennel, Welsh Onion, Chives, Lavender, Camomile, Mint, Dill, Parsley, Lovage, Borage, Marjoram & Sage.


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